2015 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 8th, 10th, 13th etc to 19th
2014 World Championships 1st, 3rd, 4th, 7th, 9th, 12th, 14th, 16th etc to 20th
2013 World Championships 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 10th, 11th, 13th - 15th, 16th, 18th, 20th
2012 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th
2011 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th ,9th, 10th etc to 19th
2011 European Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc
2010 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 4th, 7th
2010 Australian Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th
2010 European Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th
2009 World Championships 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th
2008 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th ,9th, 10th etc to 18th
2008 Australian Championships (Open) 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 10th etc
2007 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 9th etc
2007 Victorian State Titles 1st, 2nd, 3rd
2007 Australian Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 7th
2006 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 10th
2006 NSW State Titles 1st, 4th & 5th
2006 Victorian State Titles 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc
2006 Australian National Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 6th
2005 European Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc
2005 UK Championships 1st, 3rd
2005 Victorian State Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd
2005 World Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 6th
2005 Australian National Championships 2nd, 4th & 6th
2004 European Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, & 5th
2004 Victorian State Championships 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th & 6th
2004 Australian National Championships 1st & 6th
2003 World Championships 3rd
2003 Australian National Championships 1st & 3rd
2003 Victorian State Championships 1st & 2nd
2002 Victorian State Championships 1st & 2nd
2002 European Championships 3rd
2001 World Championships 3rd & 6th
1995 World Championships 1st & 2nd
1995 Australian Championships 1st & 2nd

 

 

The KA Sail Moth program saw success from the very beginning when Tim Webster asked Andrew McDougall to design a Moth sail in 1995 for the Lake Macquarie World Championships. After some months of cajoling, Andrew finally agreed to make them from mono-film. Emmet Lazich also ordered one (much to Tim's disgust). The two of them took the top two places in the Australian and World Championships that year, starting a new era in cambered Moth sails.

As Andrew was no longer sailing a Moth, development of the sails was erratic at best until in early 2001 when, after a break of nearly 16 years, Andrew got back into Moths to have another crack at the World championships in Japan. After a lot of training through Melbourne's cold winter, Andrew only dropped one place since the last attempt (in 1985), to come a close third with his MSL5 design. As a result of the campaign, more development work was completed in six months around the 2001 World Championships than the previous six years.

Andrew sailing with the MSL5 in the 2001 Japan World Championships.

In December 2002, the MSL6 model was released with much anticipation from the international Moth fleet as it is a huge jump on all previous moth sails. It is noticeably and if not extremely easy to sail in moderate to high winds due to its low profile, low centre of effort and its ability to totally flatten off unlike any moth sail has ever done before.

In the light airs, it is just as efficient and adjustable, giving it the best performance of any of the KA sails to date. This theory was only reinforced at the 2002/3 Australian National Championships some three weeks later when Rohan Veal won the title and Andrew McDougall was third.


Rohan Veal and Andrew McDougall on the way to a first and third at the 2003 Australian Championships both using the MSL6.

In March 2003, the MSL7 prototype was designed, built and tested right here in Melbourne, Australia at our new sail loft showing huge improvements over the MSL6. Using a MSL7 production model, Rohan Veal finished 3rd in the 2003 World Championships held in France.

 


The MSL7 with square top head and low foot.

The MSL8 has a number of small changes over the MSL7 to improve on accurate sail adjustment, including screw in batten tensioners but more noticeably, the use of our new X-ply sail cloth to increase durability and sail life. Our mono-film now has a large black weave going through it which enables us to use a lighter weight film and therefore not only makes the sail stronger, but also reduces the overall weight by 500 grams. Rohan Veal used this sail to win the 2004 Australian National Titles in Lake Coothabra.

 


The MSL8.

The MSL9 was the biggest breakthrough however in terms of results and sales. The design was improved, luff round increase, seam shape decreased, head profile reshaped, clew raised and improved mini leach battens. The MSL9 filled 5 of the top 6 results at the 2005 Worlds not to mention 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th at the 2005 European Championships held in Lake Garda, Italy. In July 2006, the MSL9's also went on to claim 1st, 2nd and 3rd overall in the 2006 World Championships in Denmark.

 


The MSL9F as used by Rohan Veal to win the 2005 World Championships.

The MSL10 has had limited success so far against the MSL9's to date, due to the flatter design and the sail area reduction, now in place from the International Moth Class Association. However the MSL10 has been proven to be the fastest upwind sail on the market in anything from 18-30 knots of wind. It is also ideally suited to a sub 65kg helmsman that wants an all-conditions and bulletproof sail.

 


The MSL10 with distinctive hollow leach.

Due to the new size restrictions in place on any new Moth sails made after 1 January 2005, the MSL10 was the first batch of sails to be made by any sailmaker under the new rules. The 0.25m reduction in total area from the MSL9 meant that there was a challenge for the KA Sail design team to make the MSL10 just as fast by reducing drag. The result was fantastic for strong winds, however it suffered in light winds due to the flatter shape and shorter sail width.

We have since improved on this design with the MSL11 which was released in November 2005.

 


Scott Babbage finished 2nd overall in the 2006 Australian Championships using the MSL11.

Since November 2005, KA has built and sold more MSL11's than any other Moth sail ever made. It has also helped win three major titles in Australia, including the Australian National and both the Victorian and NSW State Championships.

In November 2006, the MSL12 was released as a slight upgrade on the MSL11. The changes included new colour scheme to reduce heat around the mast, black batten pockets to see sail shape better and a larger hounds fitting hole to allow for a wider range of masts to fit.

During 2007 the development process went down a path where two sails had been developed, allowing designs that cater for lighter sailor and heavier sailors. The MSL 10 and MSL 13 have won all before them in recent years, giving the Moth fleet a variety of options depending on their weight and conditions.

For the current sail desgins click here

 



Simon talks about the rig. Simon almost exclusively uses the MSL10 with the stiff mast.

I thought I'd write down some notes on how I handle my rig. It's kind of hard to shout to people on the water as we fly past each other so I hope this helps. Andrew has added a piece on the bottom for MSL13 users too.

The KA Sail Moth program saw success from the very beginning when Tim Webster asked Andrew McDougall to design a Moth sail in 1995 for the Lake Macquarie World Championships. After some months of cajoling, Andrew finally agreed to make them from mono-film. Emmet Lazich also ordered one (much to Tim's disgust). The two of them took the top two places in the Australian and World Championships that year, starting a new era in cambered Moth sails.

As Andrew was no longer sailing a Moth, development of the sails was erratic at best until in early 2001 when, after a break of nearly 16 years, Andrew got back into Moths to have another crack at the World championships in Japan. After a lot of training through Melbourne's cold winter, Andrew only dropped one place since the last attempt (in 1985), to come a close third with his MSL5 design. As a result of the campaign, more development work was completed in six months around the 2001 World Championships than the previous six years.

Andrew sailing with the MSL5 in the 2001 Japan World Championships.

In December 2002, the MSL6 model was released with much anticipation from the international Moth fleet as it is a huge jump on all previous moth sails. It is noticeably and if not extremely easy to sail in moderate to high winds due to its low profile, low centre of effort and its ability to totally flatten off unlike any moth sail has ever done before.

In the light airs, it is just as efficient and adjustable, giving it the best performance of any of the KA sails to date. This theory was only reinforced at the 2002/3 Australian National Championships some three weeks later when Rohan Veal won the title and Andrew McDougall was third.


Rohan Veal and Andrew McDougall on the way to a first and third at the 2003 Australian Championships both using the MSL6.

In March 2003, the MSL7 prototype was designed, built and tested right here in Melbourne, Australia at our new sail loft showing huge improvements over the MSL6. Using a MSL7 production model, Rohan Veal finished 3rd in the 2003 World Championships held in France.

 


The MSL7 with square top head and low foot.

The MSL8 has a number of small changes over the MSL7 to improve on accurate sail adjustment, including screw in batten tensioners but more noticeably, the use of our new X-ply sail cloth to increase durability and sail life. Our mono-film now has a large black weave going through it which enables us to use a lighter weight film and therefore not only makes the sail stronger, but also reduces the overall weight by 500 grams. Rohan Veal used this sail to win the 2004 Australian National Titles in Lake Coothabra.

 


The MSL8.

The MSL9 was the biggest breakthrough however in terms of results and sales. The design was improved, luff round increase, seam shape decreased, head profile reshaped, clew raised and improved mini leach battens. The MSL9 filled 5 of the top 6 results at the 2005 Worlds not to mention 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th at the 2005 European Championships held in Lake Garda, Italy. In July 2006, the MSL9's also went on to claim 1st, 2nd and 3rd overall in the 2006 World Championships in Denmark.

 


The MSL9F as used by Rohan Veal to win the 2005 World Championships.

The MSL10 has had limited success so far against the MSL9's to date, due to the flatter design and the sail area reduction, now in place from the International Moth Class Association. However the MSL10 has been proven to be the fastest upwind sail on the market in anything from 18-30 knots of wind. It is also ideally suited to a sub 65kg helmsman that wants an all-conditions and bulletproof sail.

 


The MSL10 with distinctive hollow leach.

Due to the new size restrictions in place on any new Moth sails made after 1 January 2005, the MSL10 was the first batch of sails to be made by any sailmaker under the new rules. The 0.25m reduction in total area from the MSL9 meant that there was a challenge for the KA Sail design team to make the MSL10 just as fast by reducing drag. The result was fantastic for strong winds, however it suffered in light winds due to the flatter shape and shorter sail width.

We have since improved on this design with the MSL11 which was released in November 2005.

 


Scott Babbage finished 2nd overall in the 2006 Australian Championships using the MSL11.

Since November 2005, KA has built and sold more MSL11's than any other Moth sail ever made. It has also helped win three major titles in Australia, including the Australian National and both the Victorian and NSW State Championships.

In November 2006, the MSL12 was released as a slight upgrade on the MSL11. The changes included new colour scheme to reduce heat around the mast, black batten pockets to see sail shape better and a larger hounds fitting hole to allow for a wider range of masts to fit.

During 2007 the development process went down a path where two sails had been developed, allowing designs that cater for lighter sailor and heavier sailors. The MSL 10 and MSL 13 have won all before them in recent years, giving the Moth fleet a variety of options depending on their weight and conditions.

For the current sail desgins click here

 .



 

With the top 15 Moths at the 2011 World Championships using KA Sails, and KA Sail dominating the previous five world Championships and most national championships, KA, with its windsurfing heritage creates tough, fast, easy-to-use sails

 

MSL16 - Built for the conditions expected at the 2012 World Championships at Campioni, Lake Garda - light at the windward mark, breezy at the leeward mark, plenty of wind variation.

  • Here are the features of the new sail
  • Complete redesign from the previous MSL at 10 and 13
  • Wider luff pocket
  • Combination of soft and light materials for the pocket
  • Shape moved forward and down to reduce drag /increase power
  • Gap between sail and boom closed.
  • Extra cam and batten in at the bottom of sail
  • Suits medium mast/soft with high forestay for improved response to the vang and Cunningham.
  • Brand new cams for better entry profile
  • The MSL16, which is a limited edition sail will be available to order from March 1st.
  • Mach2 masts with the new hound configuration are now available. A hounds kit which allows people to convert existing Mach 2 masts is also available

 

MSL16 - Black Rock, Victoria


MSL10Ca - 8.0m: Optimized for medium+ winds
  • Changes for Revision Ca (Mid 2011)
  • Tack to lower batten reinforced.
  • Changes for Revision C (Oct 2010)
  • Head shape refined, smoother and flatter.
  • Added zips for easy rigging.
  • New cams that better engage with mast.
  • Widened sock in lower sections.
  • Raised tack eyelet
  • Changes for Revision B (Dec 2007)
  • Longer foot
  • Slightly hollow leach
  • Wider luff pocket
  • Refined shaping to optimize efficiency once on the foils
  • Better range of downhaul tension without head distortion
  • New profiled battens
  • New mini battens
  • More streamlined batten ends
  • Symmetrical batten pockets
  • 250gm lighter.
  • Originally developed as a high wind foiling sail, it was proven to be a far superior in speed, particularly upwind.


MSL10 - Scott Babbge: Mornington Victoria

Photographer: Kylie Dunstan

 

 


MSL13.2 - 8.0m: Optimized for all round wind
  • 13.2 Changes (Sept 2010)
  • Head shape refined, smoother and flatter.
  • Added zips for easy rigging.
  • New cams that better engage with mast.
  • Widened sock in lower sections.
  • Raised tack eyelet
  • MSL31.1 (May 2008) A complete redesign aimed at extending the range of the MSL12
  • Longer foot
  • Wider luff pocket
  • Refined shaping to give maximum power to get on the foils while keeping very good high wind performance
  • Better range of downhaul tension without head distortion
  • New profiled battens
  • New mini battens
  • More streamlined batten ends
  • Symmetrical batten pockets
  • 250gm lighter

MSL13 - Andrew McDougall: Dubai

Photographer: Thierry Martinez

 

 

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